Nicolas Altstaedt

Nicolas Altstaedt
Nicolas Altstaedt, cellist (b. 1982). Photo by Marco Borggreve

Monday, April 23, 2018

Ernest Bloch: Schelomo, Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra – Nicolas Altstaedt, Gürzenich-Orchester Köln, Lahav Shani (HD 1080p)














Accompanied by the Gürzenich-Orchester Köln under the baton of the Israeli conductor Lahav Shani (b. 1989), the award-winning German-French cellist Nicolas Altstaedt (b. 1982) performs Ernest Bloch's Schelomo: Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra. The concert was recorded at Kölner Philharmonie, on June 20, 2017.



Schelomo, subtitled "Rhapsodie hébraïque", was written in the space of six weeks during January and February 1916. Bloch had, over a number of years, noted down thematic ideas for a vocal setting of selected verses from the biblical book of Ecclesiastes, the authorship of which is attributed to King Solomon (Hebrew: Schelomo) who reigned some 3000 years ago. Bloch had felt, however, that French, German or English were somehow unsuitable for the purpose, and that his grasp of Hebrew was inadequate. Coming into contact with the celebrated Russian cellist Alexandre Barjansky (1883-1961) and his wife Katja in Geneva towards the end of 1915 (some six years after their first meeting), Bloch was keen to share with them his "Jewish Cycle" in general, and this new work in particular. Barjansky was greatly moved by what he heard. Realizing that the cello was the solution to the language problem, Bloch reformulated his sketches and passed them to Alexandre for scrutiny, while Katja at the same time made a small sculpture of King Solomon. In gratitude, Bloch dedicated Schelomo to the Barjanskys.

According to Bloch: "It is possible to imagine that the solo cello is the incarnation of King Solomon, and that the orchestra represents his internal world and his experience of life, though sometimes it is the orchestra that seems to reflect Solomon's thoughts, while the solo instrument voices his words: ‘All is vanity’". Bloch places much emphasis on the king's pessimism, despite "the royal pomp, the treasure, the wealth, the power, the women, all that a man might desire in this world", and "the barbaric coloration of an Oriental world" that surround him. The rhapsodic manner and glittering instrumentation may give the work an improvised air, but the underlying structure is a sturdy "ternary" form (ABA), plus an introduction and coda.

The heroic melody that appears before and during the great orchestral climaxes occurring towards the end of the first and third sections of Schelomo is built upon motifs that bear a remarkable resemblance to the those of Tzur Yisroel ("Rock of Israel"), a traditional chant that Bloch received from Reuben Rinder (1887-1966, Cantor at Temple Emanu-El, San Francisco) in the late 1920s while preparing his Avodath Hakodesh ("Sacred Service", 1930-1933). Nevertheless, although numerous motifs throughout the six published works of the "Jewish Cycle" are the composer's subconscious transformations of biblical and cantorial chant, in only one instance did Bloch acknowledge that he had consciously taken a melody from a traditional source – a motif that his father "sang often, in Hebrew", which appears for the first time at the beginning of the middle section of Schelomo. Bloch quoted the Hebrew text in a letter written to his mother four years after the work had been completed; and the melody is, in fact, an adaptation of a South German cantorial chant Uv'chen ten pachdecha, sung in Ashkenazi synagogues during High Holy Days.

"Almost all my works, even the darkest ones, still end optimistically, or at least with some hope. This is the only one that concludes in complete negation. But the subject demanded it." The opening of Ecclesiastes confirms Bloch's observation: "The words of Kohelet, the son of David, king in Jerusalem. Vanity of vanities, saith Kohelet... And I applied my heart to seek and to search out by wisdom concerning all things that are done under heaven... and, behold, all is vanity and a striving after wind".

Despite the enormously demanding technical skills required of the soloist, this is not a concerto in the usual sense, and virtuosity is always the servant of that expressiveness in which the spiritual and sensual are fused.

Source: Alexander Knapp (hyperion-records.co.uk)



Ernest Bloch (1880-1959)

♪ Schelomo: Rhapsodie Hébraïque for Violoncello and Orchestra (1916)


Encore:

Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

♪ Le carnaval des animaux / Carnival of the Animals (1886)

xiii. Le Cygne (The Swan)


Nicolas Altstaedt, cello

Gürzenich-Orchester Köln
Conductor: Lahav Shani

Kölner Philharmonie, June 20, 2017

(HD 1080p)















Renowned worldwide for his musical integrity and effortless virtuosity German-French cellist Nicolas Altstaedt (b. 1982) is one of the most sought after and versatile artists today. As a soloist, conductor and artistic director of he enthralls audiences with repertoire spanning from the baroque to the contemporary.

At the beginning at the 2017-2018 season he performed the highly acclaimed Finnish Premiere of Esa-Pekka Salonen's new cello concerto under the baton of the composer at the Helsinki Festival. He will be Artist in Spotlight at the Concertgebouw in 2017-2018 and Artist in Residence 2018-2019 at the NDR Elbphilharmonie Hamburg, where is going to perform with Krzysztof Urbanski, Hannu Lintu and Christoph Eschenbach.  Later on he will be touring major european venues with the SWR Orchestra with Teodor Currentzis, the BBCSO, La Chambre Philharmonique with Emanuel Krivine and the Amsterdam Sinfonietta. Further engagements include debuts performances with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Yomiuri Nippon Symphony in Suntory Hall, Finnish Radio Symphony, Helsinki Philharmonic, Konzerthaus Orchestra Berlin with Juraj Valcuha, the Scottish Chamber as Soloist and conductor, Orchestre National de Belgique, Hongkong Sinfonietta and Les Violons du Roy as well as returning to the Deutsche Sinfonie-Orchester Berlin with Robin Ticciati.

Awarded the Credit Suisse Young Artist Award in 2010, he gave a highly acclaimed performance of the Schumann concerto with the Vienna Philharmonic under Gustavo Dudamel at the Lucerne Festival. Since then he has performed worldwide with orchestras such as the Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich, Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Tchaikovsky Symphony Orchestra, Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, Melbourne- and New Zealand Symphony Orchestras working with conductors like Sir Roger Norrington, Andrew Manze, Lahav Shani, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Sir Neville Marriner, Vladimir Fedosseev, Leif Segerstam, Dmitri Slobodeniouk, Alexander Shelley, Fabien Gabel, Joshua Weilerstein, Gustavo Gimeno, Giovanni Antonini and Andrea Marcon amongst many others.

In recital, Nicolas performs solo and with partners Fazil Say and Alexander Lonquich. He will tour both Europe and the US and will visit Istanbul, London Wigmore Hall, Bozar, Tonhalle Zurich, Koerner Hall Toronto, Theatre des Champs-Elysées, Amsterdam Concertgebouw and New York Carnegie Hall amongst others.

In Autumn 2017 Nicolas toured  Australia extensively as part of a Musica Viva Recital tour with Aleksandar Madzar.

As a chamber musician, Nicolas regularly plays with Janine Jansen, Vilde Frang, Andreas Ottensamer, Pekka Kuusisto, Antoine Tamestit, Lawrence Power, Jonathan Cohen and the Quatuor Ébène performing at Salzburg Mozart and Summer Festival, Verbier, Utrecht, BBC Proms, Lucerne, Gstaad, Musikfest Bremen, Schleswig-Holstein, Rheingau and Stavanger.

In 2012 Nicolas has been chosen by Gidon Kremer to become his successor as the new artistic director of the Lockenhaus Chamber Music Festival and in 2014, Adam Fischer asked him to follow in his footsteps as Artistic Director of the Haydn Philharmonie, with whom he regularly performs at the Vienna Konzerthaus, Esterházy Festival and will tour both China and Japan in the next season.

Nicolas premieres new music and performs with composers like Thomas Ades, Jörg Widmann, Thomas Larcher, Matthias Pintscher, Bryce Dessner, Nico Muhly and Fazil Say. He has commissioned the pianist/composer Hauschka as part of this season as Artistic Director of "Viva Cello" Festival in Liestal in 2016 inspired by a film script by Federico Fellini as well composers Sebastian Fagerlund, Thomas Larcher, Bryce Dessner and Helena Winkelman for new cello concertos.

Nicolas' recent recording of CPE Bach Concertos on Hyperion with Arcangelo and Jonathan Cohen received the BBC Music Magazine Concerto Award 2017. This year, he released a Recital CD with Fazil Say on Warner. Previous recordings of cello concerti by Haydn, Schumann, Ligeti, Shostakovich and Weinberg have been acclaimed worldwide.

Nicolas Altstaedt was a BBC New Generation Artist 2010-2012 and a recipient of the "Borletti Buitoni Trust Fellowship" in 2009. He plays a Giulio Cesare Gigli cello, Rome around 1760.

Source: nicolas-altstaedt.com















Prodigiously gifted Israeli conductor, Lahav Shani's conducting career was launched when he won first prize at the 2013 Gustav Mahler International Conducting Competition in Bamberg. Since then he has quickly established himself as one of the most talked about young conducting talents making a huge impression with his astonishing maturity and natural, instinctive musicality.

In August 2016 it was announced that Shani will become Chief Conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra in September 2018, taking over from Yannick Nézet-Séguin and becoming the youngest chief conductor in the orchestra's history. In the 2020-2021 season, Shani will succeed Zubin Mehta as Music Director of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, and will be the orchestra's Music Director Designate from 2019-2020. In the 2017-2018 season, Shani became Principal Guest Conductor of the Vienna Symphony Orchestra, following a number of appearances with the orchestra since his debut in May 2015, including a major European tour in January 2016.

Recent and upcoming highlights as a guest conductor include the Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, London Symphony Orchestra, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Dresden Staatskapelle, Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Boston Symphony, Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestre de Paris, Philadelphia Orchestra, Royal Stockholm Philharmonic, Bamberger Symphoniker and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France.

Shani made a sensational debut with the Berlin Staatskapelle in June 2014 with concerts at the Berlin Konzerthaus and the Berlin Philharmonie, and has since returned regularly to conduct both at the Berlin Staatsoper and for symphonic concerts. In December 2015 Shani stepped in, at short notice, to make his debut with the Vienna Philharmonic in the Musikverein when he directed Bach: Concerto in D minor from the keyboard and conducted Mahler 1 winning a standing ovation from the public and high praise from the critics.

In October 2013 Shani was invited to open the season of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. An immediate re-invitation followed for the next two seasons and in December 2016 he conducted the final concert of the orchestra's 80th birthday celebrations. His close relationship with the Israel Philharmonic started in 2007 when he performed Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto under the baton of Zubin Mehta and then continued in the following years as both a pianist and also as a double-bass player.

Shani was born in Tel Aviv in 1989 and started his piano studies aged six with Hannah Shalgi, continuing with Prof. Arie Vardi at the Buchmann-Mehta School of Music in Tel Aviv. He then went on to complete his studies in conducting with Prof. Christian Ehwald and piano with Prof. Fabio Bidini, both at the Academy of Music Hanns Eisler Berlin. Whilst a student he was mentored by Daniel Barenboim.

Shani has play-directed piano concerti with orchestras including the Philharmonia Orchestra, Staatskapelle Berlin, and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France. Upcoming piano engagements include appearances with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and the Beethoven Triple Concerto with Renaud and Gautier Capuçon with the Israel Philharmonic. He will also make his recital debut at the Boulez Saal in Berlin this season. Shani also has considerable experience performing chamber music and makes his playing debut this season at the Festival d'Aix-en-Provence and at the Cologne Philharmonie, as well as returning to the Verbier Festival where he made his debut in July 2017.

Source: intermusica.co.uk (2018)



















































More photos


See also

Felix Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor – Vlad Stanculeasa, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Lahav Shani

Gustav Mahler: Symphony No.1 in D major "Titan" – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Lahav Shani

Lahav Shani: An Exciting Young Conductor

Friday, April 20, 2018

Giuseppe Verdi: Messa da Requiem – Marita Solberg, Tuija Knihtilä, Barry Banks, Henning von Schulman, Gothenburg Symphony Chorus & Orchestra, Roberto Rizzi Brignoli (HD 1080p)














The Italian conductor Roberto Rizzi Brignoli directs Verdi's Requiem with Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra and Choir with soloists Marita Solberg (soprano), Tuija Knihtilä (mezzo-soprano), Barry Banks (tenor) and Henning von Schulman (bass). The concert was recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall on October 21, 2017.

Requiem, also called Requiem Mass, Italian in full Messa da requiem per l'anniversario della morte di Manzoni 22 maggio 1874 ("Requiem Mass for the Anniversary of the Death of Manzoni May 22, 1874"), requiem mass by Giuseppe Verdi, intended as a memorial to a departed hero – the poet, playwright, and novelist Alessandro Manzoni. Requiem premiered in Milan on May 22, 1874. It is Verdi's largest-scale nonoperatic work.

The leading Italian writer of the 1800s, Manzoni played the role in Italy that Goethe had for an earlier generation of Germans: that of the country's literary soul. On May 22, 1873, when Manzoni passed away, all Italy mourned. Verdi, in a letter to his publisher, expressed a wish to write something in memory of Manzoni. Determined to conduct the work himself on the first anniversary of Manzoni's death, Verdi arranged with the city of Milan that the premiere would take place in San Marco. Requiem premiered on schedule to massive public acclaim. The performance at San Marco was followed by three more at La Scala.

In the opening "Requiem Aeternam", "Te Decet Hymnus", and "Kyrie" sections, Verdi gradually builds up energy on flowing lines of imitative polyphony.

The second movement, which has 10 sections, begins with a "Dies Irae" that spans roughly half an hour by itself. It opens with strident brass, swirling strings and the tumultuous fury of the chorus's lines. For the "Tuba Mirum" portion, the solo trumpet grows to a trumpet ensemble as the composer evokes the trumpet that on Judgment Day calls forth the dead from their graves. Also of note in this movement are the virtuosic use of the vocal quartet in the "Rex Tremendae" section and the tenor aria in the "Ingemisco".

The "Offertorio" (third movement) sets the chorus aside in favour of the vocal quartet, though the chorus returns in force for the "Sanctus" (fourth movement). The "Agnus Dei" (fifth movement) begins with the soprano and mezzo-soprano in lullaby-like a capella lines, before being joined gently by the chorus and orchestra. The "Lux Aeterna" (sixth movement) combines the mezzo-soprano not with the soprano, but rather with the tenor and bass, as shimmering string tremolos seek to capture the sense of that eternal light.

For the seventh and final movement, "Libera Me", Verdi provides assertive lines for the solo soprano, while the chorus is set in a far more soft-spoken fashion, at least until the return of the tempest of sound that is the "Dies Irae". The "Requiem Aeternam" of the first movement is also repeated. In the final section of the work, Verdi layers the choral parts into a restless fugue.

Source: Betsy Schwarm (britannica.com)


Verdi completed his Requiem Mass in April 1874 and conducted the first performance on May 22, 1874, at the church of San Marco in Milan. The work is scored for solo quartet, mixed chorus, and an orchestra consisting of three flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, four bassoons, four horns, four trumpets (with four additional trumpets offstage), three trombones and tuba (replacing the obsolete ophicleide), timpani, bass drum, and strings.



Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901)

♪ Messa da Requiem (1874)

i. Introit and Kyrie (chorus, soloists)
ii. Dies irae
Dies irae (chorus)
Tuba mirum (chorus)
Mors stupebit (bass)
Liber scriptus (mezzo-soprano, chorus)
Quid sum miser (soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor)
Rex tremendae (soloists, chorus)
Recordare (soprano, mezzo-soprano)
Ingemisco (tenor)
Confutatis (bass, chorus)
Lacrymosa (soloists, chorus)
iii. Offertory
Domine Jesu Christe (soloists)
Hostias (soloists)
iv. Sanctus (double chorus)
v. Agnus Dei (soprano, mezzo-soprano, chorus)
vi. Lux aeterna (mezzo-soprano, tenor, bass)
vii. Libera me (soprano, chorus)
Libera me
Dies irae
Requiem aeternam
Libera me

Marita Solberg, soprano
Tuija Knihtilä, mezzo-soprano
Barry Banks, tenor
Henning von Schulman, bass

Gothenburg Symphony Choir
Choir Master: Alexander Einarsson

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Roberto Rizzi Brignoli

Gothenburg Concert Hall, October 21, 2017

(HD 1080p)















Roberto Rizzi Brignoli graduated with honors in Piano at the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory in Milan, where he also studied composition and conducting. Until 2002, he was Head of Music Services at the Teatro alla Scala and eventually started collaborating with Riccardo Muti, whose appreciation of him resulted in Brignoli conducting numerous productions there.

The turning points of his career and the events which made him internationally renowned were the productions of Donizetti's Lucrezia Borgia and Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur, when he took over the musical direction at short notice, gaining a huge success.

The emphasis of his artistic work lies in the whole range of the Italian and French operatic repertoire, as well as in the classic, romantic, up to the modern symphonic repertoire. During his intense symphonic activity he worked with such institutions as the Orchestra dell'Arena di Verona, Orchestra Sinfonica del Teatro dell'Opera di Roma, Orchestra of Teatro Carlo Felice in Genova, Orchestra dei Pomeriggi Musicali in Milan, I Cameristi della Scala, Orchestra Toscanini of Parma, Orchestra of the Deutsche Oper in Berlin, Limburger Symphonic Orchestra, Radio Filharmonisch Orkest in Amsterdam, Orchestra of the Opéra de Lyon, Orchestre National de Lille, Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Orchestre National de France.

In addition to his extensive symphonic work, Roberto Rizzi Brignoli also led countless opera stagings, including Otello, La Traviata, Rigoletto, I Due Foscari, L'elisir d'amore, Adriana Lecouvreur, and La Fille du Régiment at the most renowned opera houses and festivals in Italy, Spain, France, Japan, Switzerland, the USA, and Germany, including Hamburg and at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, with whom he has had a close relationship since several years and where he is annually leading, in particular, new productions.

In 2010, Roberto Rizzi Brignoli made his acclaimed debut at the Metropolitan Opera in New York with La Bohème. Highlights of recent years include Rigoletto at the Avanches Festival and at the Chorégies d'Orange, Norma, Tosca, Luisa Miller, and La Fille du Régiment in Lausanne, Lucia di Lammermoor, I due Foscari, La Traviata, as well as the greatly successful new productions of La Rondine (Stage Director: Rolando Villazón) and L'Elisier d'Amore at the Deutsche Oper Berlin, Macbeth, Lucia di Lammermoor und Il Trovatore in Lille, Manon Lescaut in Muscat, Un ballo in Maschera in Metz, Il Turco in Italia in Hamburg, Il Trovatore in Luxemburg, and Lucia di Lammermoor in Avignon.

Among his projects in season 2017-2018 are La Bohème in Metz, Nabucco at Deutsche Oper Berlin and at the Opéra de Lille, Madama Butterfly at Staatstheater Stuttgart, Il barbiere di Siviglia at the Opéra de Marseille, Simon Boccanegra in Dijon, Anna Bolena in Lausanne, as well as concerts in Gothenburg and Avignon.

Roberto Rizzi Brignoli has recorded for Sony and a recording for Warner is following soon. Furthermore, the productions of Adriana Lecouvreur performed at the Teatro alla Scala, as well as La Rondine at Deutsche Oper Berlin are available on DVD.

Source: orlob.net



















































More photos


See also

Giuseppe Verdi: Messa da Requiem – Tamara Wilson, Alisa Kolosova, Dimitri Pittas, Morris Robinson, BBC Proms Youth Choir, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Marin Alsop

Giuseppe Verdi: Messa da Requiem – Michèle Crider, Markella Hatziano, Gabriel Sadé, Robert Lloyd, London Symphony Chorus & Orcherstra, Richard Hickox (Audio video)

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Genesis: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra (HD 1080p)














Genesis means beginning, and it is also the title of the Book of Genesis. In clarinettist Martin Fröst's latest project, ancient Greek music is juxtaposed against Anders Hillborg's urban sound – a time span of almost 2000 years! "We start with the roots of the music and explore how through them we can open a new musical door to the future", says Martin Fröst.

In the acclaimed performance of Genesis, charismatic clarinetist and conductor Martin Fröst builds upon music from 300 years before the beginning of our era and spans musically up to our time.

Clarinetist and conductor Martin Fröst continuously explores different aspects of the essence of music, creating new artistic expressions with both old and newly written music. The origins and development of classical music comprise the theme of Genesis, and we get to follow along on a journey through musical history, from ancient jester traditions to brand new music by Anders Hillborg. In between are wonderfully swinging klezmer pieces, musical invocations and bustling Baroque.

"It's all connected, and the music also reflects people. When I listen to a modern piece, I sometimes experience a cross-section of musical history layered into the music. Because so much more unites old and new music and music from different parts of the world than one might think. For example, this can be heard when the piece ‘Jag vet en Dejlig Rosa’ transitions into Olivier Messiaen's ‘Les offrandes oubliées’. Or how Anders Hillborg's newly composed piece is a response to Hildegard of Bingen's music, which is nearly 900 years old", comments Martin Fröst on his performance of Genesis.

The concert performance was recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall on January 27, 2018.


With English subtitles



Genesis: a concert performance of Martin Fröst

Anders Hillborg: Incantation
Hildegard von Bingen: Ancient Suite (Arr. Jonas Forssell)
Georg Philipp Telemann: Presto from Concerto for recorder, flute, strings and harpsichord (Arr. Jonas Forssell)
Astor Piazzolla: La muerte del Ángel
Jonas Dominique: Duo No.1 & Duo No.2 for clarinets
Anders Hillborg: Hymn of Echoes
Anders Hillborg: Hyper Run from Clarinet Concerto "Peacock Tales", Millenium Version
Anders Hillborg: Primal Blues
Göran Fröst: Klezmer Dance No.2
Béla Bartók: Romanian Folk Dances
Jonas Dominique: Duo No.4 for clarinets
Traditional: Let's Be Happy. Royal Wedding Version (Arr. Göran Fröst)
Anders Hillborg: Hyper Exit

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor & clarinet soloist: Martin Fröst

Härlanda flickkör
Birgitta Mannerström-Molin, choirmaster

Håvard Lysebo, flute
Magnus Holmander, clarinet
Sandra Ibarreche Burgos, clarinet
Olof Wendel, cimbalom

Ambra Succi, choreographer
Maja Andersson, koreografassistent
Linus Fellbom, lighting design

Gothenburg Concert HallJanuary 27, 2018

(HD 1080p)















Martin Fröst (b. 1970) is a Swedish clarinetist and conductor. As a youth, Fröst began musical studies on violin at age 5. At age 8, he started to learn the clarinet. He studied with Hans Deinzer in Germany and Sölve Kingstedt and Kjell-Inge Stevensson in Stockholm.

Fröst's work in contemporary music includes collaborations with Anders Hillborg, Krzysztof Penderecki, Kalevi Aho, Rolf Martinsson, Bent Sørensen, Victoria Borisova-Ollas, Karin Rehnqvist and Sven-David Sandström.

Fröst was artistic leader of the Vinterfest music festival for 10 seasons, concluding his tenure in 2015. He became joint artistic director of the Stavanger International Chamber Music Festival in 2010, and served in that until 2015. He has been a conductor-in-association with the Norrköpings Symfoniorkester (Norrkoping Symphony Orchestra). In May 2017, the Swedish Chamber Orchestra announced the appointment of Fröst as its next principal conductor, effective with the 2019-2020 season, with an initial contract of 3 seasons.

In the USA, in October 2014, Fröst first appeared with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO). Based on this concert, in November 2014, the SPCO named Fröst one of its Artistic Partners, effective with the 2015-2016 season, with an initial contract of 4 years. He was to have made his first appearance in the post in November 2015, but was unable to perform due to Meniere's Disease. The effects of the ailment delayed Fröst's appearances as an SPCO artistic partner until February 2017.

Fröst and his family live in Stockholm. He has recorded commercially for such labels as BIS Records and Sony Classical. In May 2014, he received the Léonie Sonning Music Prize, the first clarinetist so honoured.

Source: en.wikipedia.org



In May 2017, it was announced that Martin Fröst will be Chief Conductor of the Swedish Chamber Orchestra from the 2019-2020 season and he will return to the Orchestra in autumn 2017. Known for artistic collaborations worldwide, this season he continues as Artistic Partner with both The Saint Paul Chamber and Royal Stockholm Philharmonic orchestras, at which he launchs a new project Retrotopia including a new commission by Jesper Nordin. This project follows in the footsteps of his critically acclaimed project Genesis, which he also performs this season with the Gothenburg Symphony. In 2017-2018 Fröst will also be Artist in Residence at L'Auditiori, Barcelona appearing with the Orquestra Simfònica de Barcelona I Nacional de Catalunya and performing a number of chamber concerts. These positions follow his success in recent seasons as Artist-in-Residence at the Amsterdam's Concertgebouw, Gothenburg Symphony and London's Wigmore Hall.

In autumn 2017, Fröst is joined by Janine Jansen, Lucas Debargue and Torleif Thedéen to release Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time, his second recording for Sony Classics. Together this season, the Quartet will give performances of the work worldwide, including at New York's Carnegie Hall, as well as in Barcelona, Toronto and Quebec City. Fröst's first recording for the label, Roots, received huge critical acclaim and in recognition he received the 2016 ECHO Klassik Instrumentalist of the Year Award for clarinet. Chamber dates this season also include a return to Schubertiade and London's Wigmore Hall to perform with Quatuor Ébène. Fröst regularly performs with leading international artists including Sol Gabetta, Yuja Wang, Leif Ove Andsnes, Roland Pöntinen, Maxim Rysanov and Antoine Tamestit.

Highlights of his last season included debuts with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (Osmo Vänskä) and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (Edo de Waart). He also returned to the Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival (Paavo Järvi), NHK Symphony Orchestra (David Zinman) and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, with whom he also toured Europe. Future tour partners include the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the NDR Radiophilharmonie.

Source: harrisonparrott.com



















































More photos


See also


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro | Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No.4 in B flat major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Martin Fröst (HD 1080p)

Olivier Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps – Martin Fröst, Lucas Debargue, Janine Jansen, Torleif Thedéen (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)


Dollhouse: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra


Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts


Friday, April 13, 2018

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Overture to The Marriage of Figaro | Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No.4 in B flat major – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Martin Fröst (HD 1080p)














Under the baton of the Swedish clarinetist and conductor Martin Fröst, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra performs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Overture to The Marriage of Figaro, K.492, and Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No.4 in B flat major, Op.60. The concert was recorded at Gothenburg Concert Hall on January 27, 2018.



Le Nozze di Figaro, ossia la folle giornata (The Marriage of Figaro, or The Day of Madness), K.492, is a comic opera in four acts composed in 1786 by Mozart, with an Italian libretto written by Lorenzo Da Ponte based on a stage comedy by Pierre Beaumarchais, La folle journée, ou le Mariage de Figaro. The opera was the first of three collaborations between Mozart and Da Ponte; their later collaborations were Don Giovanni and Così fan tutte. The Overture to the Marriage of Figaro was written just a couple of hours before the opera's premiere. Unusually, it does not quote any music from the opera itself.

Source: musopen.org


Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No.4 in B flat major, Op.60, is a creation that found no justice, considered to be an intermediary symphony between Symphony No.3 and Symphony No.5. The story of its appearance is pretty uncertain because no drafts remained. We only know it was written while Beethoven was working on Symphony No.5. Nevertheless, it can be considered a study on the problematic of classical symphony.

Part I (Adagio – Allegro vivace) starts with a slow introduction which contains all the traces of the entire symphonic discourse, coming as a true synthesis of the symphony. The two themes are successively shown in the form of sonatas with great concision, the movement ending in a Coda which is nothing but a culmination and not a conclusion as we might have expected from his previous works.

Part II (Adagio) its main theme is of great musicality through the prime violins and it is followed by another theme with resonances from the previous symphony.

Part III (Allegro vivace) is full of life, structured on Beethoven's scherzo principle, only much more improved. Thematic elements can be easily recognized from the introduction of the first part.

Part IV (Allegro ma non troppo) in the form of a sonata with a Coda in large dimensions, it expresses the same vital force and joy of life.

The freshness and spontaneity of the themes, the lack of tragic motives, the perfection of the form triggered the enthusiasm of his contemporaries. German composer Robert Schumann was comparing it to "a supple Greek girl, standing in between two giants from the West", while Felix Mendelssohn chose it to be performed at his first concert at Gewandhaus in Leipzig.

Source: all-about-beethoven.com



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

♪ Overture to The Marriage of Figaro, K.492 (1786)


Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

♪ Symphony No.4 in B flat major, Op.60 (1806)

i. Adagio – Allegro vivace
ii. Adagio
iii. Allegro vivace
iv. Allegro ma non troppo


Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Martin Fröst

Lighting design by Linus Fellbom

Gothenburg Concert Hall, January 27, 2018

(HD 1080p)















Martin Fröst (b. 1970) is a Swedish clarinetist and conductor. As a youth, Fröst began musical studies on violin at age 5. At age 8, he started to learn the clarinet. He studied with Hans Deinzer in Germany and Sölve Kingstedt and Kjell-Inge Stevensson in Stockholm.

Fröst's work in contemporary music includes collaborations with Anders Hillborg, Krzysztof Penderecki, Kalevi Aho, Rolf Martinsson, Bent Sørensen, Victoria Borisova-Ollas, Karin Rehnqvist and Sven-David Sandström.

Fröst was artistic leader of the Vinterfest music festival for 10 seasons, concluding his tenure in 2015. He became joint artistic director of the Stavanger International Chamber Music Festival in 2010, and served in that until 2015. He has been a conductor-in-association with the Norrköpings Symfoniorkester (Norrkoping Symphony Orchestra). In May 2017, the Swedish Chamber Orchestra announced the appointment of Fröst as its next principal conductor, effective with the 2019-2020 season, with an initial contract of 3 seasons.

In the USA, in October 2014, Fröst first appeared with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO). Based on this concert, in November 2014, the SPCO named Fröst one of its Artistic Partners, effective with the 2015-2016 season, with an initial contract of 4 years. He was to have made his first appearance in the post in November 2015, but was unable to perform due to Meniere's Disease. The effects of the ailment delayed Fröst's appearances as an SPCO artistic partner until February 2017.

Fröst and his family live in Stockholm. He has recorded commercially for such labels as BIS Records and Sony Classical. In May 2014, he received the Léonie Sonning Music Prize, the first clarinetist so honoured.

Source: en.wikipedia.org



In May 2017, it was announced that Martin Fröst will be Chief Conductor of the Swedish Chamber Orchestra from the 2019-2020 season and he will return to the Orchestra in autumn 2017. Known for artistic collaborations worldwide, this season he continues as Artistic Partner with both The Saint Paul Chamber and Royal Stockholm Philharmonic orchestras, at which he launchs a new project Retrotopia including a new commission by Jesper Nordin. This project follows in the footsteps of his critically acclaimed project Genesis, which he also performs this season with the Gothenburg Symphony. In 2017-2018 Fröst will also be Artist in Residence at L'Auditiori, Barcelona appearing with the Orquestra Simfònica de Barcelona I Nacional de Catalunya and performing a number of chamber concerts. These positions follow his success in recent seasons as Artist-in-Residence at the Amsterdam's Concertgebouw, Gothenburg Symphony and London's Wigmore Hall.

In autumn 2017, Fröst is joined by Janine Jansen, Lucas Debargue and Torleif Thedéen to release Messiaen's Quartet for the End of Time, his second recording for Sony Classics. Together this season, the Quartet will give performances of the work worldwide, including at New York's Carnegie Hall, as well as in Barcelona, Toronto and Quebec City. Fröst's first recording for the label, Roots, received huge critical acclaim and in recognition he received the 2016 ECHO Klassik Instrumentalist of the Year Award for clarinet. Chamber dates this season also include a return to Schubertiade and London's Wigmore Hall to perform with Quatuor Ébène. Fröst regularly performs with leading international artists including Sol Gabetta, Yuja Wang, Leif Ove Andsnes, Roland Pöntinen, Maxim Rysanov and Antoine Tamestit.

Highlights of his last season included debuts with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (Osmo Vänskä) and New Zealand Symphony Orchestra (Edo de Waart). He also returned to the Lincoln Center's Mostly Mozart Festival (Paavo Järvi), NHK Symphony Orchestra (David Zinman) and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, with whom he also toured Europe. Future tour partners include the BBC Symphony Orchestra and the NDR Radiophilharmonie.

Source: harrisonparrott.com







































More photos


See also

Genesis: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra (HD 1080p)

Olivier Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps – Martin Fröst, Lucas Debargue, Janine Jansen, Torleif Thedéen (Download 96kHz/24bit & 44.1kHz/16bit)

Dollhouse: a concert performance of Martin Fröst – Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra – All the posts


Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Robert Schumann: Symphony No.1 in B flat major "Spring" | Dmitri Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor | Claude Debussy: Printemps – Ray Chen, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Hannu Lintu – Friday, April 13, 2018, 10:45 AM EDT (GMT-4) – Livestream

Ray Chen (Photo by Sophie Zhai)
















Trumpets begin Schumann's First Symphony announcing an awakening – Spring! The air is filled with sounds of a world turning green as everything bursts to life. Woven with the colors and vitality of Winter's end, Schumann sought to cure our longing for a new season. Hannu Lintu leads the Detroit Symphony Orchestra on a program featuring Ray Chen, one of the most compelling young violinists today, who's sparking his own musical awakening, with millions of followers online.


Friday, April 13
Los Angeles: 07:45 AM
Lima: 08:45 AM
Detroit, New York, Toronto: 10:45 AM
Brasília: 11:45 AM
London: 03:45 PM
Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Madrid, Rome, Warsaw: 04:45 PM
Athens, Kiev, Jerusalem, Moscow, Ankara: 05:45 PM
Beijing, Manila: 10:45 PM
Tokyo, Seoul: 11:45 PM

Find in my time zone


Live on Livestream




Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

♪ Printemps, L.68 (1887)

i. Très modéré
ii. Modéré


Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)

♪ Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, Op.77 (1947-1948)*

i. Nocturne (Moderato)
ii. Scherzo (Allegro)
iii. Passacaglia (Andante)
iii(a). Cadenza
iv. Burlesque (Allegro con brio – Presto)


Robert Schumann (1810-1856)

♪ Symphony No.1 in B flat major "Spring", Op.38 (1841)

i. Andante un poco maestoso – Allegro molto vivace – Animato
ii. Larghetto
iii. Scherzo: Molto vivace – Trio I: Molto più vivace – Tempo I –  Trio II – Coda
iv. Allegro animato e grazioso


Ray Chen, violin*

Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Hannu Lintu

(HD 720p)


Live from Orchestra Hall, Max M. Fisher Music Center, Detroit


Friday, April 13, 2018, 10:45 AM EDT (GMT-4) / 05:45 PM EEST (UTC+3)


Live on Livestream


Ray Chen is a violinist who redefines what it is to be a classical musician in the 21st Century. With a media presence that enhances and inspires the classical audience, reaching out to millions through his unprecedented online following, Ray Chen's remarkable musicianship transmits to a global audience that is reflected in his engagements with the foremost orchestras and concert halls around the world.

Initially coming to attention via the Yehudi Menuhin (2008) and Queen Elizabeth (2009) Competitions, of which he was First Prize winner, he has built a profile in Europe, Asia, and the USA as well as his native Australia both live and on disc. Signed in 2017 to Decca Classics, the summer of 2017 has seen the recording of the first album of this partnership with the London Philharmonic as a succession to his previous three critically acclaimed albums on SONY, the first of which ("Virtuoso") received an ECHO Klassik Award. Profiled as "one to watch" by the Strad and Gramophone magazines, his profile has grown to encompass his featuring in the Forbes list of 30 most influential Asians under 30, appearing in major online TV series "Mozart in the Jungle", a multi-year partnership with Giorgio Armani (who designed the cover of his Mozart album with Christoph Eschenbach) and performing at major media events such as France's Bastille Day (live to 800,000 people), the Nobel Prize Concert in Stockholm (telecast across Europe), and the BBC Proms.

He has appeared with the London Philharmonic Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra, Leipzig Gewandhausorchester, Munich Philharmonic, Filarmonica della Scala, Orchestra Nazionale della Santa Cecilia, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and upcoming debuts include the SWR Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, Pittsburgh Symphony, Berlin Radio Symphony, and Bavarian Radio Chamber Orchestra. He works with conductors such as Riccardo Chailly, Vladimir Jurowski, Sakari Oramo, Manfred Honeck, Daniele Gatti, Kirill Petrenko, Krystof Urbanski, Juraj Valcuha and many others. From 2012-2015 he was resident at the Dortmund Konzerthaus and in 2017-2018 will be an "Artist Focus" with the Berlin Radio Symphony.

His presence on social media makes Ray Chen a pioneer in an artist's interaction with their audience, utilising the new opportunities of modern technology. His appearances and interactions with music and musicians are instantly disseminated to a new public in a contemporary and relatable way. He is the first musician to be invited to write a lifestyle blog for the largest Italian publishing house, RCS Rizzoli (Corriere della Sera, Gazzetta dello Sport, Max). He has been featured in Vogue magazine and is currently releasing his own design of violin case for the industry manufacturer GEWA. His commitment to music education is paramount, and inspires the younger generation of music students with his series of self-produced videos combining comedy and music. Through his online promotions his appearances regularly sell out and draw an entirely new demographic to the concert hall.

Born on March 6, 1989 in Taiwan and raised in Australia, Ray was accepted to the Curtis Institute of Music at age 15, where he studied with Aaron Rosand and was supported by Young Concert Artists. He plays the 1715 "Joachim" Stradivarius violin on loan from the Nippon Music Foundation. This instrument was once owned by the famed Hungarian violinist, Joseph Joachim (1831-1907).

Source: raychenviolin.com

















With a "scrupulous ear for instrumental color and blend" (Washington Post) and bringing "a distinctive dynamism to the podium" (Baltimore Sun), the 2017-2018 season marks Hannu Lintu's fifth year as Chief Conductor of the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra. Last season's highlights include a concert tour to Russia, with performances at the Moscow Conservatory, Vyborg's House of Culture and St Petersburg's Philharmonic Grand Hall, and a performance of Väinö Raitio's opera Princess Cecilia (the first in 80 years) at the Helsinki Festival – both part of celebrations marking 100 years of Finnish independence. On Independence Day (6 December 2017) the Orchestra honours its 90th anniversary and 100-year-old Finland, premiering newly commissioned works by longtime FRSO collaborator Magnus Lindberg and Lotta Wennäkoski. Seven more premieres are scheduled throughout the season, along with performances of Bartók's Bluebeard's Castle and Beethoven's Fidelio among others. In March 2018 the FRSO tours Spain and Germany with cellist Sol Gabetta, taking in such venues as the Berlin Philharmonie and the Cologne Philharmonie.

Highlights of Lintu's 2017-2018 season include returns to the Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, Washington's National Symphony Orchestra, and the Dallas Symphony and Detroit Symphony orchestras. Lintu also makes his debut with the Naples Philharmonic, Singapore Symphony and Hiroshima Symphony orchestras. Recent engagements include the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Luzerner Sinfonieorchester, Orquesta Sinfónica de Galicia, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, and the St Louis Symphony, Baltimore and Toronto Symphony orchestras, as well as three acclaimed European debuts: Staatsorchester Stuttgart Opera, Radio-Symphonieorchester Wien and NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester.

A regular in the pit, Lintu returns to the Savonlinna Opera Festival in July 2018 to conduct Verdi's Otello – in 2017 he conducted Aulis Sallinen's Kullervo as part of Finland's centenary celebrations. The Finnish National Opera and Ballet also honoured 100 years of independence in a special collaborative project with director/choreographer Tero Saarinen of Sibelius's Kullervo, with Lintu receiving rave reviews: "No other conductor – including several distinguished Sibelians – I have heard in this music has been quite so willing to show what makes [Kullervo] so original" (Opera Magazine, May 2017). Previous productions with Finnish National Opera include Parsifal, Carmen, Sallinen's King Lear, and Wagner's Tristan und Isolde in spring 2016. Lintu has also worked with Tampere Opera and Estonian National Opera.

Hannu Lintu has made several recordings for Ondine, Naxos, Avie and Hyperion. His recording of selected works by Erkki-Sven Tüür (with Christoffer Sundqvist, Pekka Kuusisto and the FRSO) was released in February 2017; Prokofiev's Piano Concertos with Olli Mustonen, Mahler's Symphony No.1, and Messiaen's Turangalîla Symphony with Angela Hewitt and Valerie Hartmann-Claverie are among other recent releases. Lintu has received several accolades for his recordings, including a 2011 Grammy nomination for Best Opera CD, plus Gramophone Award nominations for his recordings of Enescu's Symphony No.2 with the Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra and the Violin Concertos of Sibelius and Thomas Adès with Augustin Hadelich and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra.

Hannu Lintu was born on October 13, 1967 in Rauma, Finland, and studied cello and piano at the Sibelius Academy, where he later studied conducting with Jorma Panula. He participated in masterclasses with Myung-Whun Chung at the Accademia Chigiana in Siena, Italy, and took first prize at the Nordic Conducting Competition in Bergen in 1994.

Source: hannulintu.fi















Claude Debussy: Printemps, L.68

One of Debussy's assignments as a Prix de Rome scholar at the Villa Medici in 1887 was to send back to the Fine Arts Academy in France an orchestral score so his benefactors could judge his professional progress. All Debussy managed to turn in was a piano duet called Printemps, or "Spring"; he claimed that the full score, complete with humming chorus, had been destroyed in a fire. Not until 1913 did he get around to generating an orchestral version, and even then the work was assigned to Henri Büsser who, working from the keyboard original, had no access to any original choral material. In a nod to the music's origins, Büsser included a prominent but not quite concertante keyboard part in the finished score.

The Academy committee found the piece to be excessively progressive, which in the late 1880s meant little more than Wagnerian in its chromaticism. (The committee's condemnation includes the first recorded application of the term "Impressionism" to Debussy's music.) Only in the orchestration did the music begin to sound like mature, Impressionistic Debussy, that effect achieved through timbre rather than harmony. The composer said he intended to compose a work "of a particular color, covering as wide a range of sensations as possible". Actually, in terms of sensations, Printemps is limited to two: yearning, giving way to relaxed happiness. Debussy described the music's program as "the slow, laborious birth of beings and things in nature, and then their blossoming outward and upward, and finally a burst of joy at being reborn to new life". Consequently, the piece falls into two movements, both at moderate tempo, and neither employ particularly straightforward or memorable melodic material; the emphasis is entirely on mood.

Source: James Reel (allmusic.com)



Dmitri Shostakovich: Violin Concerto No.1 in A minor, Op.77

As many know, Shostakovich wrote two violin concertos. But his work list suggests two separate versions of the First, the Op.77 and the Op.99. The Violin Concerto No.1 was originally completed in 1948, but withheld for seven years by the composer, owing to the oppressive climate for artists in the Soviet Union at the time. Any new work might have drawn the wrath of Stalin and his cronies in the arts. Shostakovich returned to the score in 1955 and then assigned the higher opus number to it. Actually, the only documented change he made came not as a result of second thoughts, but as a matter of consideration for the soloist. During rehearsals in 1955, the virtuoso violinist David Oistrakh requested of Shostakovich that the opening statement of the fourth movement's main theme be given to the orchestra, so that the soloist could take a rest following the long cadenza which leads right into the finale, and Shostakovich agreed to make the change.

The First Violin Concerto begins as a dark work, full of that gloom and dread that pervade so many of Shostakovich's serious works. The first movement Nocturne starts off with an ominous theme that is both inwardly reflective and filled with foreboding. Midway through, a thinly veiled Dies Irae appears as the music becomes more tense. Yet, a climactic release never quite arrives and the suggested conflicts remain unresolved.


The second movement is a rather diabolical Scherzo that contains some interesting allusions, first to the third movement of the Tenth Symphony (1953) and later to the first movement of the Second Piano Concerto (1957). The violin and woodwinds scurry about to deliver the playful yet menacing material, but gradually the character of the movement becomes more sarcastic, eventually breaking into a hallucinatory folk dance. The latter part of the Scherzo sounds less acidic, the diabolic and sarcastic elements surrender to the driving, insistent energy.


The third movement is a Passacaglia that has a chorale-like quality at the outset, as the woodwinds deliver a mournful theme. The violin enters playing the main theme, one of the composer's loveliest and warmest creations. Shostakovich's 1943 Eighth Symphony's fourth movement also featured a passacaglia, though of a decidedly grimmer character. Here, there is tension, but also much beauty. The latter third of the movement is taken up by a brilliant cadenza, which leads directly into the brief finale, a Burlesque of a mostly festive nature. The mood is similar to that of the faster music in the Tenth Symphony's finale, though there are no clear thematic references. While the work ends triumphantly, its manic qualities suggest a discomfort by the composer, as though the happy resolution might have been disingenuous.


Shostakovich eliminated trumpets and trombones from the orchestration of this Concerto, and his writing is otherwise sensitive to the limited tone of a solo violin playing amid a large ensemble. A typical performance of this work lasts about 35 minutes.


Source: Robert Cummings (allmusic.com)



Robert Schumann: Symphony No.1 in B flat major "Spring", Op.38

Schumann's First Symphony came with astonishing speed. He noted "beginning of a symphony in C minor" on 21 January 1841, but the work was abandoned. Two days later, however, inspired by a poem by Adolf Böttger, he wrote "Spring Symphony started". On 24 January, the first movement of the new work was sketched and the "adagio and scherzo made ready"; on 25 January "Symphony fire – sleepless nights – on the last movement" and on the fourth and final day, "Hurrah! Symphony finished!". Orchestration would occupy him till 20 February, but in four days and nights – "it mostly seems to have been written at night" – he had effectively written the Symphony in B flat that would become his Op.38. Clara wrote in their joint diary: "I am infinitely happy that Robert has at last arrived where, with his great imagination, he belongs".

It fell to Felix Mendelssohn to premiere the work, at a concert that March when Clara would be performing for the first time since her wedding. On 6 and 10 March, Schumann went through the Symphony with Mendelssohn. The late beginner was deeply impressed by his friend's understanding: "He always sees the right thing and fastens on to it". There was, for example, a problem with the horn calls at the very opening of the symphony – valved horns were just coming in – and at a rehearsal Schumann had to rewrite the passage to obtain something more like the effect he wanted. After some furious copying of parts, the "Spring" Symphony was given at the Leipzig Gewandhaus on 31 March 1841, just over nine weeks after Schumann had started it. The evening was a triumph, with congratulations coming from all sides. The work was performed again in Leipzig on 13 August, after still further revisions.

Source: John Worthen (hyperion-records.co.uk)















More photos


See also


Jean Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor – Ray Chen, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Kent Nagano

Felix Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor – Ray Chen, Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Kent Nagano

Live on Livestream: All Past Events

Sunday, April 08, 2018

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Great Mass in C minor – Lenneke Ruiten, Sophie Harmsen, Attilio Glaser, Morgan Pearse, Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra, Netherlands Radio Choir, Markus Stenz (HD 1080p)














Under the baton of the German conductor Markus Stenz, the soloists Lenneke Ruiten (soprano), Sophie Harmsen (mezzo-soprano), Attilio Glaser (tenor) and Morgan Pearse (baritone), the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra and the Netherlands Radio Choir perform Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Great Mass in C minor, K.427. The concert was recorded on Easter Sunday, April 1, 2018, during The Sunday Morning Concert in Het Concertgebouw Amsterdam.



By the time he arrived in Vienna in 1781, having moved from his hometown of Salzburg against the wishes of his father, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart had composed 16 mass settings and an assortment of sacred choral music. In the following ten years until his death, he would produce just a handful of sacred works – among them the unfinished Requiem and incomplete Mass in C minor K.427.

The first mention of the Mass comes in a letter to his father dated 4 January 1783, in which Mozart refers to a promise he made to write a Mass in honour of his marriage to Constanze Weber. Mozart hadn't received a commission for the work, which may be one of the reasons his promise was never realised. The Kyrie, Gloria and Benedictus were fully completed, while the Credo was set only as far as the "Et incarnatus est" in draft score – the Sanctus was also reconstructed from drafts. The absence of the rest of the Credo and entire Agnus Dei meant that the work was left incomplete.


Mozart and his wife visited Salzburg towards the end of 1783 and it was here that the Mass received its first and only performance during Mozart's life, in St Peter's Abbey on Sunday 26 October, 1783. Mozart almost always had a particular voice in mind when writing vocal music – in this instance, it was Constanze who sang the soprano arias, a tribute to his newly-beloved wife.


In the midst of the Enlightenment, Emperor Joseph II's religious reforms and distrust of over-elaborate vocal music saw the decline of church music from its pre-eminent position in Viennese society. Most of Mozart's Salzburg masses were concise missa brevis settings, yet the grandeur of the Mass in C minor tells a different story: lavishly scored for four soloists, chorus and orchestra containing three trombones, it is on a scale comparable to Bach's immense B minor Mass. The exploration of older forms in the Mass in fact points to the influence of Bach and Handel. Mozart had come into contact with Baron Gottfried van Swieten soon after he arrived in Vienna, who collected the music of Bach and Handel and owned a manuscript of the B minor Mass. The vivacity of the string writing, counterpoint and stirring vocal lines are a nod to the Baroque masters with which Mozart had recently become acquainted.


The arcane, understated opening invokes a solemn mood as the chorus and orchestra navigate a chromatic, contrapuntal setting of the Kyrie. There is soon respite in the form of a florid soprano solo, soaring above the orchestra and redolent of the operatic writing that Mozart would champion throughout the 1780s. The movement ends, though, with the return of the foreboding strains of the Kyrie. The Gloria again shows the influence of Mozart's operatic style on his church music. The "Laudamus te" is a vibrant, Italianate coloratura setting which showcases the solo soprano, with the mezzo-soprano joining for a duet in the "Domine". In between these movements lies the Adagio "Gratias", which is the closest we are brought to the music of Bach and Handel. The "Qui tollis" is the most haunting music of the Mass, a visceral chain of suspensions with an unrelenting orchestral ostinato beneath. Mozart once again effortlessly transitions into the a contrasting mood for the "Quoniam" – a trio for soprano, mezzosoprano and tenor – before paving the way for a resounding fugue affirming "the glory of God the Father".


The Credo opens with the militaristic sound of unison strings and declamatory choral homophony, bringing the text to the forefront of the texture to signal the strong declaration of faith which it proclaims. Yet, it is the "Et incarnatus est" which lies at the emotional heart of the Mass, a concertante aria for solo soprano, flute, oboe, bassoon and organ obbligato. It sets just one line of text but is the longest individual movement of the entire Mass, an extended moment of serene beauty. It is then left to the Sanctus and Benedictus movements to bring the Mass to a close, rather than the conventional Agnus Dei. The former opens with the full orchestra and chorus proclaiming a fortissimo "Sanctus" before launching into a fugue for double chorus. The four soloists aren't brought together and given centre stage until the Benedictus – it is a relatively understated affair as the penitential text looks on the one hand back to Mozart's earlier mass settings, and on the other forward to the famous opera ensembles later in the decade. A brief reprise of the "Hosanna" brings the work to a premature close which in many ways lacks both musical and poetic resolution. Nevertheless, the Mass in C minor has endured as one of Mozart's most celebrated sacred masterpieces.


Source: cums.org.uk




Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

♪ Great Mass in C minor, K.427 (1782-1783)

i. Kyrie eleison
ii. Gloria in excelsis Deo
iii. Laudamus te
iv. Gratias agimus tibi
v. Domine Deus
vi. Qui tollis peccata mundi
vii. Quoniam tu solus sanctus
viii. Jesu Christe
ix. Cum Sancto Spiritu
x. Credo in unum Deum
xi. Et incarnatus est
xii. Sanctus – Hosanna
xiii. Benedictus – Hosanna

Lenneke Ruiten, soprano
Sophie Harmsen, mezzo-soprano
Attilio Glaser, tenor
Morgan Pearse, baritone

Netherlands Radio Choir
Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra

Conductor: Markus Stenz

Recorded: April 1, 2018, during The Sunday Morning Concert in Het Concertgebouw Amsterdam

(HD 1080p)














Morgan Pearse, Attilio Glaser, Sophie Harmsen, Lenneke Ruiten













Markus Stenz


























More photos


See also

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem Mass in D minor – Christine Schäfer, Bernarda Fink, Kurt Streit, Gerald Finley, Arnold Schoenberg Choir, Concentus Musicus Wien, Nikolaus Harnoncourt (Audio video)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem Mass in D minor – Dorothee Mields, Marianne Beate Kieland, Markus Schäfer, Tijl Faveyts, Choeur Arsys Bourgogne, Camerata Salzburg, Pierre Cao (HD 1080p)


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem Mass in D minor – Lorna Anderson, Daniela Lehner, Andrew Tortise, Stephan Loges, Coro & Orquesta Sinfónica de Galicia, Richard Egarr (HD 1080p)


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Requiem Mass in D minor – Werner Pech, Hans Breitschopf, Walther Ludwig, Harald Pröglhöf, Wiener Hofmusikkapelle, Josef Krips (1955, Audio video)