Matthew Bourne

Matthew Bourne

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Lukas Geniušas plays Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor – Moscow Soloists Chamber Orchestra, Ayrton Desimpelaere – XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 2, Second stage
















The International Tchaikovsky Competition, first held more than 50 years ago, is not only a valuable asset of Russian musical culture but is also one of the major events in the international music community. The International Tchaikovsky Competition is held once every four years.

The first, in 1958, included two disciplines – piano and violin. Beginning with the second competition, in 1962, a cello category was added, and the vocal division was introduced during the third competition in 1966. In 1990, a fifth discipline was announced for the IX International Tchaikovsky Competition – a contest for violin makers which was held before the main competition.

The XV International Tchaikovsky Competition was held in Moscow and St Petersburg from June 15 to July 3, 2015, and was dedicated to the 175th anniversary of the great Russian composer.

In the competition participated more than 600 artists from 45 countries.

On the jury for piano was the distinguished pianists Dmitri Bashkirov, Boris Berezovsky, Michel Béroff, Peter Donohoe, Sergei Dorensky, Barry Douglas, Denis Matsuev, Vladimir Ovchinnikov, Alexander Toradze, Vladimir Feltsman, Klaus Hellwig, and the founder and director of the Verbier International Festival and Academy, Martin Engström.

The pianists competing at the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition must perform, during the second round of the Competition, one of the seven piano concertos written by Mozart and selected by the Competition.



Mozart completed his Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor on February 10, 1785, and played the first performance the next evening in Vienna. Scoring adds a flute and two trumpets to winds, horns, timpani, and strings.

On February 11, 1785, Leopold Mozart arrived in Vienna after a wintry, bone-rattling, coach journey from Salzburg – his first visit to the capital in 12 years and his last. On the same night he attended an Akademie by his celebrated son, who had just turned 29 and was at the peak of his popularity in ever-fickle Vienna. Leopold wrote to daughter Nannerl that, in the Casino on the Mehlgrube, he beheld "a vast concourse of people of rank... The concert was incomparable, the orchestra excellent". After two arias by a singer from the Italian opera, there "came a new, superb piano concerto by Wolfgang, which the copyist was still writing when we arrived, and the rondo of which your brother hadn't time to play because he had to revise copies [of the orchestral parts]". This was the trailblazing D minor Concerto that survived the neglect of so much of Mozart's music during the nineteenth century. Beethoven, both smitten and influenced, played it publicly, with his own cadenzas in the first and last movements, where Mozart had improvised. No reports have survived of the audience's acceptance, but had they been hostile or even cool, surely Leopold would have reported this to Nannerl. His son's marriage without paternal permission in 1782 to Constanze Weber still rankled; so did their newfound independence. However, Papa's immediate and unreserved acceptance of Wolfgang's departures from tradition in the new concerto – beginning immediately with an agitated, subtly changing bass line beneath the throbbing syncopation of violins and violas – revealed a flexibility otherwise missing in his personal character. One can almost admire the manipulative Leopold for that.

In the first movement, Allegro (D minor, common time), Mozart's themes are motivic rather than conventionally melodic; more than two centuries later it remains a miracle that the soloist never plays exactly what the orchestra sets forth in the exposition, despite a rock-solid sonata structure throughout. When the piano finally enters in measure 77, it does so as an alien in a threateningly troubled land. Nor does the soloist take complete charge until the coda of the finale where, half-an-hour later, he coaxes the music into D major.

The second movement is a Romanza (B flat major, common time). Not to underrate Mozart's incomparable genius in music before this, nothing had equaled the unity of expression achieved in 1785 and after. Beyond integrating the outer movements, he made the slow movement part and parcel of the whole. This Romanza without tempo marking (but clearly Andante) is a rondo in ABACA form that plunges dramatically into G minor before the end couplet – a significant harmonic departure not just here but in the concerto's overall context.

Mozart returns to D minor ion the third movement (Allegro assai; alla breve). Until the coda, we hear one of Mozart's rare rondos in a minor key. More precisely, it is an extended sonata-rondo (ABACDA, plus coda), since C is a development, with the reprise in section D. The development again as before in the second movement seeks out G minor – the darkest key in Mozart's harmonic lexicon – before D major is finally allowed to break through, albeit a whitish and wintry sun.

Source: Roger Dettmer (allmusic.com)










Ο 15ος Διεθνής Διαγωνισμός Τσαϊκόφσκι, ο οποίος ήταν αφιερωμένος στην 175η επέτειο από τη γέννηση του μεγάλου Ρώσου συνθέτη, πραγματοποιήθηκε στη Μόσχα και στην Αγία Πετρούπολη από τις 15 Ιουνίου έως τις 3 Ιουλίου 2015.

Στο πλαίσιο του δεύτερου γύρου – στο δεύτερο από τα δύο στάδια – του διαγωνισμού στην κατηγορία του πιάνου, ο Ρώσος πιανίστας Lukas Geniušas (γενν. 1990), ο οποίος μοιράστηκε τη δεύτερη θέση με τον κινεζικής καταγωγής Αμερικανό George Li, ερμήνευσε το Κοντσέρτο για πιάνο αρ. 20 σε Ρε ελάσσονα, K.466 του Βόλφγκανγκ Αμαντέους Μότσαρτ. Την Ορχήστρα Δωματίου Οι Σολίστ της Μόσχας διηύθυνε ο 27χρονος Βέλγος πιανίστας και αρχιμουσικός Ayrton Desimpelaere.

Η συναυλία έλαβε χώρα στη Μεγάλη Αίθουσα του Ωδείου της Μόσχας, στις 25 Ιουνίου 2015.

Ο Διεθνής Διαγωνισμός Τσαϊκόφσκι, ο οποίος πραγματοποιείται κάθε τέσσερα χρόνια, είναι ίσως ο σημαντικότερος διαγωνισμός στο χώρο της κλασικής μουσικής. Ο διαγωνισμός διοργανώθηκε για πρώτη φορά το 1958, περιλαμβάνοντας μόνο δύο κατηγορίες: του βιολιού και του πιάνου. Το 1962, στη δεύτερη διοργάνωση, προστέθηκε η κατηγορία του βιολοντσέλου, ενώ στην τρίτη διοργάνωση του διαγωνισμού, το 1966, προστέθηκε ακόμη η κατηγορία της φωνής.

Στον 15ο Διαγωνισμό, το 2015, συμμετείχαν περισσότεροι από εξακόσιοι καλλιτέχνες από 45 χώρες, οι οποίοι διαγωνίστηκαν και στις τέσσερεις κατηγορίες: πιάνο, βιολί, βιολοντσέλο και φωνή.

Την κριτική επιτροπή για την κατηγορία του πιάνου αποτελούσαν οι διακεκριμένοι πιανίστες Dmitri Bashkirov, Boris Berezovsky, Michel Béroff, Peter Donohoe, Sergei Dorensky, Barry Douglas, Denis Matsuev, Vladimir Ovchinnikov, Alexander Toradze, Vladimir Feltsman, Klaus Hellwig, καθώς επίσης και ο Martin Engström, ιδρυτής και διευθυντής του Διεθνούς Φεστιβάλ και της Ακαδημίας του Βερμπιέρ.

[At present, this video is unavailable]

XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015, Piano / Round 2, Second stage

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)


♪ Piano Concerto No.20 in D minor, K.466 (1785)

i.Allegro
ii. Romance
iii. Allegro vivace assai

Lukas Geniušas, piano – Second Prize*

Moscow Soloists Chamber Orchestra
Conductor: Ayrton Desimpelaere

Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, June 25, 2015

(HD 720p)

* Second place was shared by Lukas Geniušas and George Li

















Born in Moscow in 1990, Lukas Geniušas started piano studies at the age of 5 at the preparatory department of Frédéric Chopin Music College in Moscow, going on to graduate with top honours in 2008.

He was born into a family of musicians which played a major role in Lukas' swift musical development, in particular the mentorship of his grandmother, Vera Gornostaeva, the prominent teacher and professor at the Moscow Conservatory. This early development helped Lukas become the laureate of several major competitions including the Gina Bachauer Piano Competition in Utah, the Silver medal at the Chopin International Piano Competition in 2010. Two years later he received the German Piano Award in Frankfurt am Main. His most recent victory, and one of the most important, is the Silver Medal at the XV Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow in 2015.

Lukas has appeared with numerous orchestras including the Hamburg Symphony, Duisburg Symphony, BBC Scottish Symphony, St Petersburg Philharmonic, Kremerata Baltica, Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Warsaw Philharmonic, and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, under the batons of conductors such as Valery Gergiev, Mikhail Pletnev, Andrey Boreyko, Saulius Sondeckis, Dmitry Sitkovetsky, Antoni Wit, Rafael Payare, Roman Kofman, and Dmitry Liss, to name but a few. His international career has taken Lukas to prestigious venues and festivals throughout the world, including the Rheingau, Ruhr and Lockenhaus Music Festivals, Piano aux Jacobins, the Auditorium du Louvre and Wigmore Hall, as well as to major concert halls in Russia and South America.

Highlights of the 2015/2016 season have included triumphant recitals at the Salle Gaveau in Paris and London International Piano Series, with the NHK Symphony Orchestra and Tugan Sokhiev as well as with Mikhail Pletnev and the Russian National Orchestra.  He recently performed at the La Roque d'Anthéron International Piano Festival and made his début at the Verbier Festival with solo and chamber recitals.

In the 2016/2017 season he returns to the Sala Verdi in Milan, Mariinsky-3 and the Great Hall of Moscow Conservatory, and performs début recitals at the Montreal Pro Musica series and Washington Phillips Collection. Important forthcoming engagements also include performances with Charles Dutoit and the Singapore Symphony Orchestra, with the Japan Philharmonic Orchestra under Alexander Lazarev in Yokohama, as well as with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France.

Lukas' musical interests are extensive and he explores a wide range of repertoire, from the Baroque to works by contemporary composers. His repertoire spans from Beethoven Piano Concerti through to Hindemith's "Ludus Tonalis" Cycle, as well as a strong interest in Russian repertoire such as Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov and Prokofiev. Lukas is an avid chamber musician. He is an extremely inquisitive performer and enjoys working on new works by modern composers, as well as resurrecting rarely performed repertoire.

These aspects of his career are reflected in Lukas' critically acclaimed discography, which includes his most recent recordings of the complete Rachmaninov Preludes (Piano Classics), "The Emancipation of Dissonance" (works by Desyatnikov, Arzumanov and Ryuabov) and a CD of works for violin and piano with Aylen Pritchin (Melodiya) as well as earlier recordings of Chopin Études Op.10 and 25, and Brahms and Beethoven sonatas.

At the age of 15, he was awarded a "Young Talents" federal grant from the Russian Federation and two years later received the "Gifted Youth of the 21st Century" award. Lukas has since garnered much praise and many awards in recognition of his talent, also in his native Lithuania, where he gives concerts regularly and is recognized as an outstanding performer. Since 2015, Lukas has been a featured artist of "Looking at the stars" a philanthropy project based in Toronto, whose purpose is to bring classical music to institutions and organizations (prisons, hospitals and shelters) where people may not have an opportunity to experience it live in a traditional setting.

Source: geniusas.com

















More photos


See also


Lukas Geniušas – All the posts

The winners of the XV International Tchaikovsky Competition, 2015










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